Communication technology advances

This clip shows a man who experienced great success from DBS [Deep Brain Stimulation], BUT it also demonstrates a form of group therapy for increasing volume and articulation/slurring issues.

They also speak about the prohibitive out of pocket cost for therapy. This is another reason I am pursuing getting a SpeechVive device. A person can get assistance for the purchase thru insurance.

I have copied excerpts from techpoint.org about the product: https://techpoint.org/2018/04/speechvive-reviving-speech-improving-lives/

“The company’s primary product is a non-invasive, over-the-ear device that looks a lot like a hearing aid, but it’s a lot more than that. With SpeechVive, the device detects the patient’s speech and delivers a sound stimulus into the ear, which triggers the Lombard reflex and causes the patient to speak louder and more clearly.”

“Ninety percent of people who use SpeechVive get a significant benefit — 75 percent get the benefit immediately and another 15 percent need a few weeks of using the device before getting the full effect. There is also a free SpeechVive app for iOS that uses standard earbuds to test for the Lombar. response. The app allows people to see if SpeechVive will work for them before they buy it, and the company also has a “no questions asked” 60-day money back guarantee.”

“When people think of Parkinson’s, they think about the tremors, but one of the most common symptoms of Parkinson’s is a loss of communication (89 percent) due to the patient’s inability to regulate their speech. To their friends and family they seem to be mumbling, or speaking too softly. As a result, people with Parkinson’s get interrupted and talked over, and this often leads to isolation and depression. SpeechVive, as the company moniker states, gives people with Parkinson’s their voice back by “Reviving Speech, improving lives”

I have an appointment with my Primary care Dr this coming Wednesday to get paper work signed for authorization. I intend to make progress reports, once I have my SpeechVive device. 🙂

 

PSP: Progressive Supraneuclear Palsy

No… I do not think I have the diagnosis… But since a person in one of the online communities for pwp typed she just has her Diagnosis changed to PSP and the signs and symptoms overlap with other neurodegenerative diseases, I felt I should document it.

Research is now showing that all symptoms of neurodegeneration are likely linked by common pathology, so that research may eventually unlock the secrets of more common illnesses like Alzheimers and Parkinson’s

“Last month, a terrific article was published on progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) in a nursing journal. The article shares a list of symptoms in the four stages of PSP from thePSP Association, based in the UK. The four stages are:

* early stage
* mid stage
* advanced stage
* end of life stage

The symptoms are copied below. I’m sure you can overlook the British spellings.”

Early stage:
May present via the fracture clinic, falls services, eye specialist or speech and language therapist. The early stage typically spans years 0-1.

> Ambulant.
> Occasional falls.
> Unsteadiness and poor balance.
> Possible visual problems affecting ability to read.
> Voice changes, for example reduced volume.
> Mood changes.
> Reduced socialising.
> Changes in mood and behaviour, including apathy and anxiety.

Mid stage:
Many people reach this stage before diagnosis. Consider discussing advance care planning and advance decisions to refuse treatment. Consider referral to palliative care services. The mid stage typically spans years 2-3.

> Ambulant with aids.
> High risk of falls and injury.
> Visual problems affecting self-care abilities, for example eating and walking as unable to move eyes to see.
> Speech increasingly unintelligible.
> Inability to initiate conversation.
> Impulsivity (risky or impulsive behaviour).
> Apathy.
> Dysphagia.
> High level of supervision required.
> Increasingly socially withdrawn.

Advanced stage:
Patients should be on GP palliative care register and have access to specialist palliative care.
The advanced stage typically spans years 3-6.

> Mobility significantly compromised, probably chair bound requiring a wheelchair for mobility.
> Significant visual problems.
> Significant muscle stiffness.
> Significant communication problems, but probably still able to understand.
> High risk of aspiration and pneumonia as a result of dysphagia.
> Pain.
> Increasing periods of sleepiness.
> Incontinence.
> Severely withdrawn socially.
> Dependent for most or all aspects of care.

End of life stage:
This stage is difficult to detect, but may be indicated by reduced levels of consciousness, inability to eat or drink, acute infection, a fall or major fracture, and rapid and significant weight loss. The end of life stage typically spans 6-8 weeks.

> Severe impairments and disabilities.
> Rapid and marked deterioration in condition.
> Decisions with regard to treatment interventions may be required, considering an individual’s previously expressed wishes (advance decisions to refuse treatment).TH