Following

To any of my followers who are caregivers dealing with a PwP plus dementia
I’d like to suggest a blog by a caregiver who provides such positive insights and suggestions to help a caregiver to cope he goes by AdjunctWizard
I just wanted to share an example of his writing :follow him.

Cheryl will start to tell a story about an incident that occurred earlier to me as though I am someone else. In the story she will refer to me in the third person as “your dad.” I think that she thinks I am one of our children but I could merely be a nice someone with her because sometimes she refers to me as “Paul.”
I used to resist this a bit and point out that I was me. Lately I quit doing that. I quit doing it because it aids me in finding where she is in her head and it serves no useful purpose other than to make me right and her wrong.
Typically it is a late afternoon discussion as we head somewhere for dinner. In the car she will start with, ” you know your dad and I …” After she gets her thought out I can respond with, “No kidding, I didn’t know that” or some other suitably benign response. If there is more to the story she will go on.
There is so much to learn on this road of Parkinson. If you have not tried it, take a deep breath, enjoy the ride, the scenery and the stories along the way. You cannot be sure of the weather, road conditions or the vistas ahead. Be one with the journey.

‘Go to https://adjunctwizard.com/2022/05/11/more-about-dementia To see this offering by an eldercare organization.

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livingwithdementiablog wordpress attributde to Norman McNamara)

Not for Everyone

A sweet person on a group chat asked a question: “How do you make the transition to a nursing home?

I personally don’t think I need to worry about a nursing home to the end of my life, but things do happen. My mother promised her mother she would never put her into a nursing home… But after my mother had a disabling stroke, and she was total care for my father, he had no choice but to put his mother-in-law, Lola into a home. It was the best thing that could have happened, for Lola. She met other ladies she had things incommon with. they would sit together and knit, they watched the same soap operas. She was as happy as a duck in a puddle.

So, with that knowledge…I wanted to share some thoughts gleaned from the chat: and advice that I have put in bold.

At some point your relatives may want to settle you into a nursing home. Here are some of my ideas based on shared experiences. Can you think of more ideas?
What are the advantages of moving into a nursing home?
1. You won’t have to cook your own meals any more. Granted, institutional food is not as healthy or natural as what you might fix for yourself, but normally the meals & snacks are created by professional dietician and are balanced & varied.
2. You won’t have to clean house.
3. You won’t have to do laundry.
4. You will have physical therapy available.
5. You will have activities available.
6. You won’t have to remember when to take your meds.
This may seem like not worth the price of giving up your freedom, but in many ways it will give you more freedom to write, color, listen to music, get on the internet, look out the window, and be yourself.
Before you go, be sure to pack your activities
Additionally, be sure to mark your name on everything clearly with a permanent or laundry marker. Get a silver or gold marker to mark black things. Carve your name in some things with a knife tip, engraving tool or drimel, before you mark it; cellphone, chargers, laptop.
1. Your cellphone & charger.
2. Your laptop. (Check to make sure you will have internet access.)
3. Your coloring books & colors.
4. Your music & something to play it on – headphones or earbuds are best.
5. Address &/or phone books. If you have time, program them into the contacts in your smart phone or take a picture & save it on your laptop. Be sure to save it on Cloud or Google Drive so you will still have it if something happens to your device.
6. A warm coat, hat, muffler (scarf) & gloves in case you get to (or need to) go out in colder weather.
7. Lighter outer wear including a raincoat & rain hat for cool but not cold weather.
8. A week’s worth of warm clothes, spring or fall clothes, and summer clothes.
9. PJ’s or nightgown 3 or 3 & bathrobe & slippers – 2 each.
10. A good grabber for reaching things.
11. Paper & pens & pencils & pencil sharpener.
12. A small safe, hopefully with a setable combination lock, not a key. Set the combination to a number you can easily remember.
Things you will Not need:
1. Furniture
2. Knick knacks
These may be hard for you to leave someday. Begin to eliminate what you can,. It helps to have pictures of favorite items. It also helps to bequeath them to a descendant who will value them. If not, sell them on Craig’s list & at least you will have the money for them.
Speaking of money, nursing homes are expensive. They often take the money from the sale of your home or property, so put the property in a relative’s name first and set up a bank account with a relative that does not have your name on it.
Pets – many nursing homes will allow 1 pet if you feed it and take care of letting it out to do its job yourself.

Oven wisdom

It seems only prudent of me to turn the responsability of putting items in or out of the oven to someone else who has better balance… since I do most of my falling when I lean over. Like last Wednesday, I leaned over to comfort our shepherd, lab mix by putting his ‘Thunder shirt’ on him, and found myself sitting on our closet floor.

I enjoyed reading this post from the AdjunctWizard’s Blog

My Own Reaction Surprises Me by AdjunctWizard. She wants to do it herself. We had a tough for me conversation this morning about issues we trip over as travel the annoying twisty road of Parkinson. It started out as, you know I can still do stuff.This was a response to me speculating about learning to make my own piecrust instead of buying a commercial piecrust. I will take the path of least resistance every time I can. There are enough things to staff, organize and worry about. If someone has already made the piecrust, I am good with that.I buy salad in a bag too. Dump and go. Chop a tomato and it is salad. Dressing is in the fridge.She remarked that she could make a pie and that she knew how to make piecrust. Naturally I forgot about what I have been attempting to practice on a daily basis. I started to enumerate the negatives. I caught myself before I got too far into the ditch along side this partially paved macadam thoroughfare.It is Lenten season. Instead of chasing some carryout fish fry from our parish we had the makings of tuna casserole. An old time favorite from the Dinner for Two Cookbook by Betty Crocker (You can still find one if you poke around.) Remember Betty Crocker? She is my go to for a lot of things. That seemed like an easy thing and she likes it. I said why don’t you make the tuna casserole and we can have the leftover pie for dessert.She agreed.We attended a discussion in the afternoon about newer drugs used to treat Parkinson’s disease and when they are used and how they worked. When we returned I attended to the laundry and then busied myself with work for my job at our local community college where I teach part time.She announced she was going to start on the tuna casserole. It was three pm. I spent the next hour listening and worrying and occasionally sneaking a peek into the kitchen twenty feet away. After a few misfires on her part she got started with minor aid from me. She put all the ingredients into a Corning ware bowl and mixed it. She used to know how to start the oven but that knowledge and skill has been lost to Parkinson. I told her which buttons to push and it clicked on.I went back to work on my project but gave it up for a bit when the oven played its happy tune to announce it was up to temperature and waiting. I went in for the oven placement of the casserole. She put it in but I worried while watching. (Maybe I am a worry wart.)Scary activity for someone not steady on her feet.I suppose there is a good mechanical engineering reason for oven doors to open as they do. I have not seen one built so that door opens any other way but down. A standard range winds up with the door about a foot off the floor so that the person reaches down into the oven from three feet away. It looks to me like a disaster waiting to occur. I hovered nearby as she put the casserole into the oven and then put on oven mits to get something from the fridge.We ate about an hour ahead of when we usually eat but time and calendar and sunrise and sunset seem to have less meaning for her. It is time for us to start eating dinner at four pm like the rest of the old folks.

Tips and Tricks

Steve, of American Fork wrote:

7:55 AM and I had _almost_ slept through the night when the phone rang. I failed to get it or even locate it on time. Then I remembered: It was delivery day for the new flooring for the basement apartment. That was almost certainly the delivery driver’s “courtesy call” meaning he could be here in minutes. . Panic. I tried to orient myself towards the garage, but couldn’t. I was still meds+ 1/2 hour away from being able to turn at will. Then, instinctively, I kicked my shoes off and went on my way. As I had done a thousand times before. Whoa! Does anyone else ditch the halting component (at least temporarily) by taking their shoes off? Maybe something to add to the “Tips and Tricks” section of your Parkinson’s owners manual

Quality of life

 I wrote the first four Paragraphs in ” italics“on Nov 19th.  I had probably been using the New Eden for at least 5 months.

        “I wanted to tell you about what I am using and the impact it has made in my life.  I had purchased a helmet to protect my head as I had continued to fall.  But I forgot to put it on before going to the hospital to visit a sister who had fallen and injured her back.  As I was stepping from the curb onto the sidewalk, I didn’t get my foot raised quite high enough, causing me to stumble. The thought flashed through my mind..(You didn’t put the helmet on and now you are going to face plant on the cement.)  But miraculously, I was able to move my feet quickly enough that I was enabled to recover my footing.  I’m sure it wasn’t a pretty dance, as several people came to make sure I was ok.  I attributed my rescue to be by the grace of God and the improved comprehensive nutrition of the New Eden product I had begun to consume. ”      

    “The next week, I was feeling so good, I was working outside and decided to pull a hose around to water an Angel Trumpet Bush… and as I was pulling hard, the hose snagged on something and it stopped me so suddenly that it caused me to fall backwards.  Thankfully, I had the helmet on, because I hit the cement statue of a child holding a fishing pole, so hard that I dislodged the pedestal from the soil and knocked the child off of the pedestal.  Although my shoulder was sore and where the cement had struck my spine was bruised and swollen,by the third day, the pain was all gone, the swelling had receded and it was as if it had never happened.  Again I thanked the Lord for leading me to this more comprehensive nutrition. ”        

As you probably know, people with Parkinson’s frequently cease to swing their arms as they walk.  Mine would just hang at my side.  But in about the last month I have noticed the swing has returned to my arms when I am going into a store or even around the house or going from house to car.   Again, the only thing I have added to my regime in the last little while is the more comprehensive nutrition. “

Also, my  voice has been terribly weak, and I have a friend who is hard of hearing,  When she called me on the phone this week, she said;  “You are speaking louder !  And I noticed that the last time we were together, I could hear you better !”  What can I say, but Thank you for the tool of more comprehensive nutrition.”   

On Jan 16th I added: The LuminAloe (see explanation in following paragraph) has recently been released.  John and I are about through our second tub of the product.  Since using it, I havent had any more falls, and my gag reflex has returned.  John serves in the temple every Thursday and his knee hurt so bad he had resorted to using the elevator more than not.  He reported to me that he went down two flights of stairs and was amazed that there was no knee pain.    I am looking forward to when I can cease to drool.”

The abreviated version:… Dr Reg McDaniel became acquainted with a product derived from Aloe and subsequently traveled all over the world, documenting how beneicial it was. When the FDA shut the company down, because some of the distributers were making claims that people were being healed, Dr. McDaniel improved the formula, creating a product known as New Eden, marketing it by word of mouth and radio. When his son, Reg Jr., partnered with an accomplished msrketing person, they Invited Dr. McDaniel to creat a new formulation. Dr. McDaniel, having continued his research knew of five additional ingredients he’d wanted to add. Thus was created the Q800+, named for the over 800 ailments that they have documented the previous products have reduced symptoms, by providing More Comprehensive Nutrition (MCN). But after the first batch was completed, thy have chosen from here on out they will call it by it’s primary ingredient… LuminAloe™ . Doctor McDaniel states: “This formula has a higher % of the LuminAloe™ than the previous products.” + “This last formula is themcn best yet.”

Jan 23rd

My husband has an abnormal blood clotting issue blockage in the deep veins in his legs. We have been told it is a genetic defect, which results in episodes of abnormal blood clotting. usually in the deep veins of the leg. But one of our sons who inheritrd the same defect has had clots form in his lungs. And there is always the fear of a clot breaking free and resuting in a stroke.

My husband has not used as much of the product as I have, because he wanted my cannister to last for me. But since receiving and consuming the Q800+/LuminAloe™ His blood tests have indicated his blood was too thin. So’ in two weeks and the second blood test was even thinner, the medical personnel had him reduce his medication which had been keeping his blood at a therapeutic level. Yea!! I’ll be so happy if we can get him weaned off of the prescription through More Comprehensive Nutrition.

Dr. McDaniel shares that even genetic abnormalties may be reversed because all of the nutrition coupled with the LuminAloe™ gets down to the cellular level and the DNA.

Two weeks earlier a lab drew my blood samples This past Tuesday I met with my PC Doctor to review the lab results. Before he had looked at the results, I told him I had begun using this new product. He asked me what it was, I explained a little bit and told him my arms have begun to swing again! This was a pretty big deal. Then, as he looked at the results, across the board all of the numbers had moved to the optimal range. When he got to cholesterol, he said “Wow! That Cholesterl Care I’ve had you taking must have really kicked in! Your bad cholesterol has gone way down… and your good colesterol has gone way up!” To which I responded, “Or it could be the more comprehensive nutrition I have been using, because you’ve had me on that product for quite awhile.” He proceeded to look at the rest of the report, and then said, “I’d like to know more about the supplement. If it can do that for you, maybe it can help some of my other patients!”

I have an appointment on Tuesday this next week, to share more information with him He is a wholeistic physician, who makes the products he recommends to his patients, available to them.

Service Animals and Decisions

I found this on the PdCure.org site: Services an animal can provide are:

  • emotional support and companionship
  • help maintain a walking rate of speed or gait
  • prevent freezing by pulling gently on the walker
  • pull a wheelchair
  • help promote exercise and daily walks
  • if equipped with a harness (shoulder mounted, not back), can provide stability to prevent falls
  • get help after a fall
  • aid with manual tasks like removal of socks, picking up items, retrieve the morning newspaper, retrieve hard to reach items, open doors or turn on lights

To learn more about PD service dogs and view a couple videos showing training and how they support people with PD go to this link: Service animals

I have over 400 blog posts saved in my drafts. When I typed Service Animals into my site search to see if I had already addressed the subject, it pulled up this wonderful article which came out of the 2018 World PD Congress. Since it was still in my drafts, I chose to combine into one post to share with you.

PROCRASTINATOR OR PLANNER? AT THE CROSSROADS

Are you by nature a planner or a procrastinator? As a clinical social worker in a PD Center of Excellence I work with people with Parkinson’s (PWP) and their care partners at critical crossroads of decision making, it is challenging to balance planning ahead versus staying focused in the present. My social work training and decades of experience help me appreciate that how and when we take action in the PD arena, is similar to how we behave in other arenas.  So, back to the opening question: do you tend to be a planner or a procrastinator?  Are you unsure which category you fall into?  Perhaps that’s because we don’t fall neatly into these discrete categories.  However, we do have styles and patterns for how we make decisions.  Consider these different strategies in planning a dinner party. 

The planner, weeks before the party, consults many cookbooks and online recipes and may try the recipe out ahead of time.  Planners will try to set the table a day before and does food preparation as far ahead as possible.  When guests arrive music is playing and appetizers are plated. 

The procrastinator decides to see what looks good at the market and will base the menu on that, shops for what is fresh and enjoys the excitement of trying something new. If there is last minute preparation, guests may be asked to put on an apron and help out! 

One approach isn’t better than another. The planner may feel more pressure to have all aspects of the dinner well-orchestrated.  The procrastinator may be more adventurous and is known by friends and family for spontaneity.

A great deal of humor is used regarding these two groups of individuals.  Some relevant quotes for planners: “A goal without a plan is just a wish” and “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail”.   And for the procrastinators there is humor.  For those who tend to delay there are these adages: “Tomorrow is often the busiest day of the week”, or “If it weren’t for the last minute, I wouldn’t get anything done!” and consider this one, “If procrastination was an Olympic sport, I’d compete in it later!” As is the case with all humor, joking is a way of coping with stressful life situations.  We also know that black and white categories usually don’t hold true.  In the case of procrastinators or planners most of us have some characteristics of both personalities.

The purpose of this blog is not about shame or blame for planners versus procrastinators! Rather it is about looking at how different styles for problem solving affect critical life decisions.  In my clinical work I am often asked by people with clients is it “too early” or “too late” to plan for lifestyle changes related to the diagnosis?  We know that from the moment the PWP hears the words “You’ve got Parkinson’s” life is dramatically changed.  There are cascading decisions that begin as one leaves the physician’s office after the diagnosis is made.  Questions arise such as:  when and how to share the diagnosis, should I continue to work, is driving safe, should I move, when do I explore hiring help at home and how early should I have the difficult discussions about end of life.  That is a lot to consider; fortunately there is usually time to carefully consider options.  Also, it is definitely the case that one size does not fit all.  For example, in the case of sharing the diagnosis, a younger patient who is still working, has very mild symptoms and has young children may make a different decision around disclosing the diagnosis than an older person who is more symptomatic, retired and has grown children.  Eventually, the diagnosis is shared; hopefully once shared the PWP and care partner reap the benefits of garnering important emotional support and practical help.

Let me review in greater detail one decision that is somewhat more complicated than sharing the diagnosis and often a topic for discussion with clients. “When do I need to think about a move?”  This decision brings even strong people to their knees!  Who can forget Dorothy’s famous refrain, “There’s no place like home” (The Wizard of Oz).  Attachments to home run deep; we associate home with raising children, important relationships with neighbors and the neighborhood, family holidays celebrated in the home and that intangible feeling that “Home is where the heart is”. 

There are many factors affecting the decision to move.  The commitment to remaining at home and adding home services, as needed, may work out well.  However, the decision about moving is often motivated by safety.  Older homes with stairs may present safety risks, especially for someone who has a history of falling.  Moving may be related to “downsizing”; part of a process that many begin to consider once children have left the home and the upkeep of the older house becomes a burden. Moving can bring the PWP and care partner geographically closer to where adult children are living. Or, a move to Retirement or Assisted Living helps for better access to supportive services when these are needed. But, there can be many barriers to moving.  I am not surprised when clients tell me, “There are just two things that keep me from making a move: cleaning out the attic and cleaning out the basement!”  The emotional and physical work of a move and cleaning out decades of accumulated “stuff” can paralyze anyone. It is a surprise for some to discover that efforts to “downsize” can mean paying more for a move to a smaller but newer home, condominium or Retirement community. So, how does anyone with PD accomplish this larger than life task?

There is a lot of downside to not planning for this important transition.  The process can begin early.  Some clients talk about starting to clean out closets and the dreaded basement and attic slowly.  Ask for help from adult children, especially since the clean out may include many mementos from their childhood (for example the cherished soccer trophies, or the bag of stuffed animals nobody could part with).  Professionals can be hired to assist with the actual cleaning out of belongings.  They are skilled at not letting the process get bogged down in emotionality, yet sensitive to the process of “letting go” of things (big and small).  A geriatric care manager can help think through the important “where” of a move. 

Friends and family can play an important role with this, too. Creativity is important!  One client moving from a large home to a one floor condominium planned a ceremony to bestow blessings for her new condo.  Following her Jewish traditions she gathered close friends to say the Shehechayanu; a prayer celebrating special occasions. She and her husband wanted more emphasis on the sweet than the bitter of this move.  I ask clients to think about other transitions they have made and we consider strategies they used to get through those difficult times.  It is likely that what helped in the past can be helpful now.  Finally another important tip in surviving the emotional turmoil of a move is to understand that with any transition it is normal to experience a sense of loss over what you are leaving. We all cling to what is familiar.  What we can’t know in making a move are the benefits in the new living situation.  Following a move, one can feel liberated from all of the clutter and “stuff” from the prior home.  A new living space that is accessible, promotes independence, reducing fall risks.   Or, there may be new social opportunities of a move to a retirement community.  If the move puts you closer to family, visits can be more frequent and spontaneous.

While I chose to focus on a move as a major life transition, there are general guiding principles that can be helpful at any decision crossroad:

  1. Don’t worry alone. Involve others as you consider options for change.
  2. Support groups can be lifelines at decision crossroads. Every member of the group is an “expert” and can share wisdom and experience.
  3. Gather information. The best decisions are made with facts; not driven by fears, fantasies or misinformation.
  4. Ask for help! You can do anything, but you can’t do everything.
  5. Ask members of your health care team to participate in helping you think about changes. How can the team help the PWP maximize independence, while balancing safety considerations.
  6. Pinpoint the obstacles for making change and then brainstorm solutions.
  7. It’s ok to get “stalled out”; we all need a periodic time out. But then figure out how to get back on track.
  8. Decision making is usually modifiable. Consider the metaphor of using a pencil and eraser in your planning (you probably wouldn’t use a pen to work on a crossword puzzle!)
  9. Don’t let perfect get in the way of good enough. Often a good enough plan is a starting point. Waiting for the perfect plan can be a trap.
  10. Keep humor in your back pocket. Remember these wise words: “He or she who laughs, lasts”. Laughter can be a great coping mechanism.

The ongoing task of care planning in the face of PD is challenging! But you will get through this. I talk with clients about spirituality. Prayer and belonging to a religious community can be important for healing and connection. But I use a broader approach in conversations about spirituality.  I ask the question, “What gives you strength?”  A rich discussion usually ensues. Strength, for some, is garnered by being in nature, or music can help one transcend stress, others turn to gathering the family for ceremony and celebration. There are so many ways that each of us find to cope and remain resilient.  Think about what has given you strength in the past and tap into those resources as you find your way. 

https://www.worldpdcongress.org/home/2018/8/14/procrastinator-or-planner-at-the-crossroads

Encouraging report

This was taken from a post on a forum I participate in. The contributor uses the sign in name of … PrayN4aCure

“I wanted to give this forum an update on my participation in the clinical trial at the University of Texas in Houston. I was reluctant to comment beforestudy was completed but was compelled by my wife to do so. It has been nearly one month since my first infusion, but my family has witnessed some clear improvements.”

“The first thing that they noticed was my freezing has completely stopped. The next biggest changes are that I no longer have any tremors, my rigidity has lessened, and my gait has improved where I no longer drag my right leg. What I noticed, is my speech has improved along with my vision has become clearer, and my jaw and tongue no longer quiver when I open my mouth.”

“I only had a 33% chance of receiving the real stem cells on the first leg, so I wasn’t expecting anything, but I did notice after 2 two weeks I started feeling a little flushed each day. My blood pressure remained steady, and I temperature was normal, but I remember the Dr. asking me during the infusion how I was feeling and if I felt flushed. Just an observation.”

“So if I got the Placebo, all I can say is sign me up for another. I am patient 37 out of 45 and I am in the last group. Group 1 has already received their 2nd infusion and mine is scheduled at the end of February. I remain cautiously optimistic and hopeful that this study will prove to be a viable therapy for those who have any form of neuro-degenerative disease, until a complete and effective cure has been has discovered.”

“I will keep y’all updated.”

Explanation of proceedure involed: additional information provided by another forum member using the user name of Despe

“Bone marrow extraction from a healthy donor was obtained by aspiration under local anesthesia. Testing was performed using FDA-approved licensed kits by Gulf Coast Regional Blood Center. MSCs were expanded using a Terumo Quantum Bioreactor29 by the Center for Cell and Gene Therapy of Baylor College of Medicine under current Good Manufacturing Practices designated by the FDA. The total quantity of allo-hMSCs was reached in 3 passages. Thawing was initiated on infusion day, and allo-hMSCs were aliquoted into a 250-mL transfer pack with 5% buminate. Release tests were performed on the pooled cells (purity, viability, cell dose, and microbiological testing).”

I am pleased

I am pleased to alert you to a new book published by some friends of mine. We met, because of the Parkinson’s group in the villiages. John and I attended one of their seminars and deffinitley learned some valuable information which has already been of great worth. I recommend it to both caregivers and PD warriors. Sue

A new book, “Our Parkinson’s Disease Instruction Manual: How to have a good life while coexisting with Parkinson’s disease” is now available at Amazon.com. It can be purchased as a digital download or as an 8 ½ x 10 inch printed book. The digital version can be read on a Kindle, tablet, computer, or smartphone. The digital version costs $4.95 or, if you have a Kindle Unlimited subscription, there is no charge. The printed version costs $ 11.95 plus tax.  Go to Amazon.com and search for “Our Parkinson’s disease Instruction Manual”.

Authors are fellow Villagers Edmund Smith and Jane Masterson. They have 25-years of experience with Parkinson’s disease and are frequent speakers in The Villages and other places where they give a seminar entitled “Ideas for Living Well with Parkinson’s Disease”.

The book covers the following subjects in 24-chapters: How to get great medical care, Learning from others, Exercise, Drugs, Electronic gadgets, Tricks to unfreeze, Speaking loudly and clearly, Making the home PD friendly, The bathroom, The bedroom, Urinary incontinence, Keeping the caregiver healthy, Assist devices, Increasing your mobility, Lift assist, Preparing for a visit to the hospital, Inpatient rehabilitation, Driving, Flying, Vacationing, Parkinson’s and pets. The book includes thirty-five photographs and twenty-five Internet links.

Comprehensive Nutrition

  I wanted to tell you about what I am using and the impact it has made in my life.  I had purchased a helmet to protect my head as I had continued to fall.  But I forgot to put it on before going to the hospital to visit a sister who had fallen and injured her back.  As I was stepping from the curb onto the sidewalk, I didn’t get my foot raised quite high enough, causing me to stumble. The thought flashed through my mind..(You didn’t put the helmet on and now you are going to face plant on the cement.)  But miraculously, I was able to move my feet quickly enough that I was enabled to recover my footing.  I’m sure it wasn’t a pretty dance, as several people came to make sure I was ok.  I attributed my rescue to be by the grace of God and the improved comprehensive nutrition of the New Eden product I had begun to consume.            The next week, I was feeling so good, I was working outside and decided to pull a hose around to water an Angel Trumpet Bush… and as I was pulling hard,when the hose snagged on something, it stopped me so suddenly that it caused me to fall backwards.  Thankfully, I had the helmet on, because I hit the cement statue of a child holding a fishing pole, so hard that I dislodged the pedestal from the soil and knocked the child off of the pedestal.  Although my shoulder was sore and where the cement had struck my spine was bruised and swollen,by the third day, the pain was all gone, the swelling had receded and it was as if it had never happened.  Again I thanked the Lord for leading me to this more comprehensive nutrition.          As you probably know, people with Parkinson’s frequently cease to swing their arms as they walk.  Mine would just hang at my side.  But in about the last month I have noticed the swing has returned to my arms when I am going into a store or even around the house or going from house to car.   Again, the only thing I have added to my regime in the last little while is the more comprehensive nutrition.          Also, my  voice has been terribly weak, and I have a friend who is hard of hearing,  When she called me on the phone this week, she said;  “You are speaking louder !  And I noticed that the last time we were together, I could hear you better !”  What can I say, but Thank you for the tool of more comprehensive nutrition. 

I received this letter today from Dr. McDaniel:

“The clinical benefits in Parkinson’s Disease was not  a fluke or an isolated brain function restoration event.  I attach the highest level of evidence based science we have had the research funds to conduct.  It was at the Miller School of Medinine in cooperation  with the Miami Jewish Health Service.  The Jewish facility if the largest retirement in-house operation on the East Coast and has 150 dementia patient beds and an out patient group in early Alzheimer’s disease patients, not ready for being institutionalized. They had done drug company Alzheimer’s research for over 20 years and were experts. All FAILED prior research efforts conducted in the past were designed to determine if a potential drug would SLOW the progression of dementia.   They had never had a patient improve memory and cognition.”

“The idea and intent of our plan to test more comprehensive nutrition met skepticism and cynicism to the point of being insulting and hostile by the investigative team. It was worth more than any earthly value to see and hear their responses to our outcome in 30 pilot patients that the medical school IRB demanded a pilot study be done with all our funds, to show if their was toxicity.  We had no toxicity what so ever with nutrition. But we got a bonus.  There was 69% benefit to memory and cognition restoration, to their astonishment. 46% improved memory and cognition and 23% did not progress. Thus both groups beat any study ever conducted.”

“The CD-14 monocytes with adult stem cell potential increased nearly 400%/ We drew blood on entry and exit a year later and froze the serum.  When the Brain Derived Neuro-Growth Factor assay became available; the BDNGF was elevated in the serum even though it was diluted with the entire blood volume.  We had an objective  mechanism  of action (MOA) for the clinical benefits. The adult stem cells migrated into the brain to replace the degenerated neurons and the BDNGF supports the differentiation of the stem cells to become neuros to increase memory and cognition function.”

“This is why we have had multiple anecdotal reports of benefit in cerebral palsy children and adults, Parkinson’s, strokes, Down’s Syndrome, Fetal Alcohol syndrome, seizures, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, olivary nucleus dementia, fragile X dementia in boys, brain trauma and retinal blindness.  Just to name a few top incidence conditions.”\  

Dr McDaniel sent me his desk top file  on studies in which brain function was documented to have improved.  I saved them on my computer, but have not included them in this post. Please reach out to me if you would like to see the documented data.